A STUDY ON ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND DEVELOPMENT PROCESS IN DESIGN ACTIVITY

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Jan 2017

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The purpose of this research is to clarify the element of organizational structure and development process involved in design development to achieve creating highly advanced, innovative design and establishing a coherent corporate design identity thorough making a deep analysis of cases in Japanese electronics manufactures. Therefore, through considering prior studies about product development and design management, this research extracts an analytical perspective to make analysis organizational structure and development process involved in design development. This research mainly describes two points. Firstly, this research describes organizational structures and development processes that two Japanese electronics manufactures adopt. Secondly, this research describes designers communication with other department members and other designers in that organizational structures and development processes. Finally, this research makes analysis of these cases through the analysis perspective. As a result, this research finds out what natures of communications are needed among members in order to create highly advanced, innovative design and establish coherent corporate design identity. This research also finds out the element of organizational structure and development process to affect such communications among members.

Author(s): Yosuke KANNO

Architecture of Performance Buildings: Dealing with Demands of Contemporary Play

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Jan 2017

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Observed from the prospective of Architectural design, typology of performance buildings, especially theatre buildings, suffers a serious stagnation. Causes that influenced this state of play could be tracked for in development divergence of architecture on one side, and the play itself on the other. Although these two factors coexisted through history, at some point the play took swing in its evolution, occupying all available fields of plausible development, while architecture stopped at expected physical limits. Today, the generally accepted fact is that there is no strictly defined type of theatre buildings that is capable of embracing the contemporary play. The question that reveals the essence of problem is: Does the play actually need the building in any sense? This paper points out the problem of overall state and potentials of Buildings for stage performances in Serbia today, aiming to find answers for future approach to built heritage considering demands of the contemporary play. Potentials of these buildings are not to be understood in term of utilization of existing structures, but in term of detailed analytical approach toward future projects. Examining the conversion of solid, closed theatre boxes into almost undefined open spaces, according to needs and demands of the play, we tried to understand the current situation, and give an architectural answer to it. What is architecture to do in a situation when it has already reached its limits of variations as a form, while the function / program is still modifying and evolving without predictable end? While designing National Theatre in Subotica, the design team carefully observed the logic of designing fa?ade configurations. As the project of restoration, reconstruction, adaptation and annex of theatre building, situated in the very core of the towns centre, took 20 years from architectural competition to its construction, architects faced a challenging task to design a buildings skin that envelopes its 20 years old content of carefully planned functions. This project represents the finest case in our national practice of architecture trying to handle its developing art function on one side, and interacting with the city at the other. Application of glass panels that form a transparent membrane between theatre inside building and the town outside opened a possibility for architecture to take the role of mediator in this town-theatre interaction demand. We could say that architecture cleverly stepped away in secondary role, leaving the function of the building to bring out the everlasting changes of theatre play to the town. It seems that the time has come for a major attitude change - perhaps it is time to use ephemeral structures to answer ephemeral questions.

Author(s): Dragana Konstantinovic, Miljana Zekovic

Active Listening to Music ? Methodology and School Practice in

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Jan 2017

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The reform carried out in Polish school system in 1999 involved profound changes into the educational way from Kindergarten to Dissertation. The education system comprises: pre-school institutions, primary schools, lower secondary schools, upper secondary schools and post- secondary schools. The main aim of music education in schools is to stimulate comprehensive development of all students. The contents of teaching are, among others, folk, classical and pop music; main musical terminology; variety of national music ? including regional music and the diversity of other countries music. Music teaching methods include most of all, organizing and developing individual and group musical activities among students ? singing, playing instruments, and listening to music. Research and experiments show that listening to music should be introduced at the earliest age because it stimulates general and music development in young children. Listening to and getting acquainted with music is a prerequisite for shaping music abilities, first of all music memory, training concentration and music imagination. Active method of listening to music is a way to teach and learn music. Children learn through doing, exploring, playing and improvising. Music may be accompanied by clapping and stamping or by drums, sticks and other children instruments. It is an integration of movement, dance and language. One is involved not only as a listener but also as participant. During working out pieces of different composers students use movement (simple dance forms, choreography inspired by historical dance), instrumental improvisation (playing recorder, Orff instruments) and melodic recitation. Music teachers in Poland often use active methods of teaching. According to the new educational basis it is also possible to create authors teaching programs.

Author(s): Gabriela Karin Konkol

Bona Fide: The Notion of Authenticity in Digital Culture

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Jan 2017

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Exploring the notion of authenticity enables us to understand the practice and history of art as an expression of the values, beliefs, and ideas by the artists for their audiences. As described by Denis Dutton in his essay Authenticity in Art, the notion of authenticity can be broken down into two distinct categories: nominal authenticity - the identification of origins, authorship, or provenance, and expressive authenticity - the manifestation of ideals and values, both individually and collectively. While the influence of digital culture is ubiquitous and assimilated, does its impact effect the authenticity of an image or object. Or, does the intent of the artist remain the standard in which all processes are validated? In this paper, Bona Fide: The Notion of Authenticity in Digital Culture, I am interested in the ways in which an artist communicates authenticity. I will examine different art making methodologies to explore the idea of authenticity in a pluralistic, synthetic, and digital world.

Author(s): Mary Hood, Nicholas Dowgwillo, Patrick Vincent, Kathleen Moore

Between the Linear and the Lateral: Dance for Animators

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Jan 2017

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Animation may gain an insight into the understanding of the nature and aesthetics of human movement through dance and choreography. Motion-capture technology has been utilized by both dance and animators for various works: that is, performance and analysis. This technology (mo-cap) actually may offer a bridge for both the art and science of movement. this paper will include an overview of dance analysis from early techniques Delsarte, Dalcroze, Laban to the present world of motion-capture. The lecture will include DVD presentations of performance and biomechanical analysis of movement. Additional reference will highlight the authors pioneering development of Robot Choreography. 19

Author(s): Margo K. Apostolos

SUSTAINABLE HIGHER DENSITY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT: THE POTENTIAL OF ROOF-TOP ADDITIONS

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Apr 2017

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This paper discusses the potential of improving the sustainability of existing cities and towns through residential use of roof-top additions to buildings. The phenomenon of extending existing buildings by adding floors is not especially novel, there being many examples throughout history. However judging by the limited number of recent cases in most cities, this design typology appears to not have received much attention. Building on top can be shown to provide good ecological performance of individual buildings but also improved functioning of the wider built environment. The aim of the paper is through scholarly argument and international case studies to show to city authorities and the development industry the key benefits of building on top of suitable existing building stock. A hypothetical case study is presented wherein building on top is compared with demolishing the existing building and building anew. Attention is given to sustainability in terms of life-cycle assessment; embodied energy; energy in use; CO2 emissions; building materials and technologies, reduction/avoidance of demolition waste; and, footings/foundations. Wider implications of building-on-top are explored in terms of city infrastructure; city services - water, waste, power, transport; city regulations; and, city expansion. Social, cultural and economic enhancement of the city is discussed in terms of cultural heritage and activity; social behaviour, economic performance; and, public health. Case studies scope across a range of approaches and scales from single residences to medium and high density developments. Together they provide transferable ideas for sustainable higher density residential development.

Author(s): GORDON HOLDEN

Contemporary Art and the Past: Repetition or Rhyme?

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Apr 2017

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Art that rhymes with the past is inherently and inextricably linked with that past. Rhyme cannot occur without a manifestation of similarity to something that already exists. Rhyme relies for its validity on memory of, sensitivity to, and connection with what has gone before, a looking-back while concurrently being in the present, a simultaneous comparison and contrast. On the other hand, aesthetic practices that appropriate art of the past through surface duplication and repetition often deliberately eliminate attachment and meaning. These appropriated images, even if fully absorbed in a visual sense, can remain separate entities, detached from any contextual tendons. Stylistic homage can become a skin that is stretched thin, showing none of the muscular connective tissue that would indicate the existence of an underlying structure. This paper explores the vein of artistic practice in which the past exists in a contextual rhyme with the present, creating meaning as a result of that particular mode of coexistence. Negotiations of the fine line between repetition and rhyme are investigated through the works of contemporary artists, and through my own artworks, that integrate past and present. 64

Author(s): Andrea Eis

Treating University Students like Four Year Olds: Combining the Reggio Emilia Approach with Theater Technology

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Apr 2017

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Can an internationally recognized early childhood educational concept, known as the Reggio Emilia approach, provide an effective philosophy for teaching theater arts university students? Effective theater arts education includes opportunities for collaboration, social interaction, and experimentation (Mardirosian & Lewis, 2009). Key principles of the Reggio Emilia approach include collaboration, documentation and reflection, group-based knowledge construction, and a negotiated curriculum (Edwards, Gandini & Forman, 1993). Both approaches build on social constructivist theories of cognitive learning, including the works of Lev Vygotsky, Jerome Bruner, and John Dewey. This paper documents an action research project designed to implement theory to practice within a university course combining effective instruction of theater technology with the philosophy of the Reggio Emilia approach. The research location is a course titled Theater Technology being offered within the Theater Department of a flagship state university in the eastern United States. Participants include students enrolled in the course, the course instructor, and an educator with expertise in the Reggio Emilia approach. Data consists of interviews with participating students and faculty, audio transcripts of class discussion, photographs, student class journals, and video. This research has implications for teaching theater technology, course design in theatre arts, and implementing theory to practice. 43

Author(s): Michael Cottom, Peggy Martalock

Building Economic Resilience Into Urban Areas in The Face of The Global Recession

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Mar 2017

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Building Economic Resilience Into Urban Areas in The Face of The Global Recession Abstract: This paper examines the economic and employment changes affecting Australian Cities and how planning and urban design can create more resilient urban areas, better able to grow and support local jobs during the ?Global Recession. It details four key interrelated ways to building ?resilient urban areas with a ?sustainable economic future. It provides examples of ways to successfully: i) Harvest Local Wealth to generate ?greater local employment ii) Create a ?Movement Economy to increase ?custom attraction iii) Build ?Social Capital to support local business growth, and iv) Provide ?Superior Business Settings to grow local business. The paper provides a simple way to assess how well local places provide these key benefits and how they could be ?cost effectively transformed to generate significant ?place based benefits to better support existing and new business.

Author(s): DEREK KEMP

Myths and Modalities: The Filmic Universal in Alices Adventures

Art Studies and Architectural Journal (ASAJ), Volume 2, Mar 2017

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Research into film music involves multiple disciplines and an historical awareness of music and culture. Film music analysis has yet to broadly integrate such research, which is indicative of contextual, perceptual, and dramatic considerations fundamental to the repertoire. Cognitive research has led to the suggestion of perceptual models that describe tendencies and parameters multimodal processing in film. Degrees of influence have been interpreted through Cohens ?Congruence Associationist (CA) Model? which associates film viewing to general theories of cross-modal perception. In this paper I will present preliminary workings towards a multidimensional model of film music analysis in which harmonic and melodic determinations form a counterpoint with filmic gesture. This analysis is informed by concepts of metric and grouping structure introduced and developed by Lerdahl and identifies a hierarchical framework based on degrees of cognitive resonance between modes. I will apply this analysis to three film depictions of Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland from 1933, 1972 and 1985. I also hope to include remarks on the newest Alice adaptation directed by Tim Burton, to be released March 2010. This analysis reveals how musical choices interact with ?filmic universals? in key scenes to expand and elaborate multiple mythic interpretations of the classic childrens book, described by Will Brooker as: ?dark fable, innocent childrens fantasy, Freudian dreamwork, English heritage treasure, and drug hallucination.? This model may form a basis for future analyses in which musical content is shown to direct attention, increase salience, and establish meaning in film.

Author(s): Greg Bowers